News & Events

In most major cities across the country, businesses are required to benchmark their energy use. Benchmarking is mandated as it helps businesses operate their buildings with the least amount of wasted energy. The city of Columbus, Ohio realizes the benefit of benchmarking and is encouraging businesses...

In an effort to track the energy use of large commercial properties, most major U.S. cities have mandated benchmarking. Benchmarking requires property owners to annually measure their energy and water consumption and report usage to their cities through ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, the Environmental Protection...

Energy benchmarking is a foundational tool through which state and local governments are able to obtain a clear picture of how buildings are using energy and where there are opportunities for improvement. Benchmarking facilitates energy accounting for property owners, managers, and facility operators by comparing...

In 2012, Philadelphia’s Energy Benchmarking and Disclosure Law requires some property owners to report annual utility data for energy benchmarking. What is the Philadelphia Energy Benchmarking Law? Owners of large commercial and multi-family buildings that are larger than 50,000 square feet are annually required to report all utility data...

Beginning in 2018, the New York Energy Benchmarking Local 84 Law requires some property owners to annually measure and report their utility data in a process called benchmarking. What is New York City Energy Benchmarking? New York City requires benchmarking for buildings that exceed 50,000 gross square feet, two...

In 2013, the City of Boston enacted the Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure Ordinance (BERDO), which requires some property owners to annually benchmark and report their utility data. Owners of nonresidential buildings that are 35,000 square feet or larger, residential buildings that are 35,000 square feet...